Community Leaders in Chicago to Discuss Actions Needed to Address Current Immigration Wave

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 30, 2024
CONTACT: 
Yanci Nuñez | [email protected] (312) 866-0312
Samantha Ruvalcaba | [email protected] (312) 235-4612
Interviews available

 

In this conversation, organizations will provide the latest updates on actions taken by the City of Chicago, and key civil society actors, to welcome and support new arrivals and what’s ahead in 2024.

 

CHICAGO — This Thursday, February 1, Alianza Americas, the Latino Policy Forum, Center for Immigrant Progress, The Resurrection Project, and the National Immigrant Justice Center, will host Part II of our three-part webinar series titled “Contextualizing the Migrant Crisis Narrative,” an effort from Latino and immigrant advocacy groups to broaden understanding of multiple and complex factors that migrants from Latin America and the Caribbean confront when deciding to come to the United States. This webinar series arrives at a critical moment as Congress and the White House continue negotiations around proposed changes to immigration policy that will have detrimental impacts on migrant communities and those rightfully seeking safety and a dignified life in the United States. 

 

Part II: Chicago’s Response & Lessons Learned, takes place this Thursday, February 1 at 10 am CT. We will focus on providing the latest updates on actions taken by the City of Chicago and the local community response to welcome and support new arrivals as well as discuss long-term needs and systemic changes necessary to support new and long-term residents. The panelists for this conversation are Eréndira Rendón, The Resurrection Project; Lisa Koop, National Immigrant Justice Center; and Marilu Moreno, Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights. This conversation will be moderated by Sandra Diaz, Center for Immigrant Progress and Alianza Americas Board Member. 

 

“As Republican states such as Texas continue to bus migrants to cities like Chicago as a political stunt, it has exposed long-existing societal failures in areas related to foreign policy, public welfare, immigration policy, and ethnic and racial relations across the nation. In this context, civil society organizations have played an active role in providing assistance and orientation to new arrivals. In this conversation, we will hear firsthand what some of these organizations on the ground have observed and their analysis of how we can address it in a humane and dignified manner,” says Sandra Diaz, Director of Communications at the Center for Immigrant Progress and BOD Member, Alianza Americas.

 

To register for the February 1 event, visit: https://bit.ly/CMNChiResLL

 

Panelists will be available for interviews immediately following each event. 

 

This will be a conversation in English with simultaneous Spanish interpretation.

 

Part III: Addressing the Tension Between Black and Latino Communities  takes place on Thursday, February 22 at 9:30 am CT with the participation of Eréndira Rendón, The Resurrection Project; Benji Hart, interdisciplinary artist, author, & educator; and Matt DeMateo, New Life Centers of Chicagoland, moderated by Sylvia Puente, Latino Policy Forum

 

Watch here the recording of Part I: A Deep Dive into the Causes of Migration

 

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About Alianza Americas

Alianza Americas is the premier transnational advocacy network of Latin American migrant-led organizations working in the United States, across the Americas, and globally to create an inclusive, equitable and sustainable way of life for communities across North, Central and South America.

 

About the Latino Policy Forum

The Latino Policy Forum is the only organization in the Chicago area that facilitates the involvement of Latinos at all levels of public decision-making. The Forum conducts analysis to inform, influence and lead. Its goals are to improve education outcomes, advocate for affordable housing, promote just immigration policies, and engage diverse sectors of the community, with an understanding that advancing Latinos advances a shared future. For more information, visit www.latinopolicyforum.org.

 

About Center for Immigrant Progress

The Center for Immigrant Progress is a grassroots organization led by young leaders passionate about social justice and immigrant rights. Our mission is to build communities that provide protection, education, and social and economic opportunity for immigrant children and families. Our vision is an immigrant community that is self-empowered, and civically engaged to transform social structures that benefit all people. For more information, visit www.centerforimmigrantprogress.org

 

About The Resurrection Project

The Resurrection Project (TRP) builds trusting relationships to educate and propel individuals, immigrants, and families to achieve their social and economic aspirations, stable homes, and equitable participation in their community. TRP is a leading provider of affordable housing, financial education, and immigration services on Chicago’s Southwest side.

During the past three decades TRP has worked to improve the lives of individuals and families by creating wealth, building assets, and engaging residents to be catalysts for change. Rooted in the Pilsen community, TRP’s impact now extends across the City of Chicago and through the State of Illinois; we are making steady progress towards leveraging and preserving more than $1 billion in community wealth by 2025. To learn more about our programs and services visit us at www.resurrectionproject.org.   

About the National Immigrant Justice Center

Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) is dedicated to ensuring human rights protections and access to justice for all immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers.

With offices in Chicago, Indiana, San Diego, and Washington, D.C., NIJC provides direct legal services to and advocates for these populations through policy reform, impact litigation, and public education. Since its founding three decades ago, NIJC has been unique in blending individual client advocacy with broad-based systemic change.

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