Negative Consequences of Ending Temporary Protected Status (TPS) in El Salvador and Honduras for US Interests in Promoting Prosperity, Security and Governance in the Northern Triangle

Policy Brief

Negative Consequences of Ending Temporary Protected Status (TPS) in El Salvador and Honduras for US Interests in Promoting Prosperity, Security and Governance in the Northern Triangle

This paper explores the negative impacts of ending TPS for Hondurans and El Salvadorans for  U.S. investments in improved security, prosperity and governance in the region.  The United States has allocated more than US$1.3 billion to the US Strategy for Engagement in Central America since it was approved in 2014.  The current Trump Administration budget proposal would push that to $1.8 billion. The strategy describes three lines of work—Prosperity, Security, and Governance—aimed at moving toward “sustained, broad-based economic growth, better government performance, and improved security conditions” and “advance[ing] economic and social inclusion and safeguard[ing] citizen safety and security.”   At the Conference on Prosperity and Security in Central America in Miami this past June, Vice President Pence affirmed the U.S. government commitment to a “stronger, safer, and more prosperous Central America.”  All of these goals would be undermined by ending TPS.

This document focuses on the negative implications of ending TPS in terms of its repercussions for Central America and undermining US foreign policy interests and investments in that region.  Of course, there would also be profound human, economic and social costs in the United States of ending TPS for people who have deep roots in this country.  Those negative impacts have been thoroughly documented, most recently in studies by Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC),  Center for Migration Studies, and researchers at the Center for Migratory Research at the University of Kansas, with the support of migrant organizations  For more information, see the Alianza Amercias TPS Campaign page. (http://www.alianzaamericas.org/save-tps/).